The lowdown on driving app downloads with Universal App campaigns

Universal App campaigns (UAC) help you find new app users across Google’s largest properties: Google Play, Search, YouTube and Gmail, as well as millions of websites and apps across the Google Display Network. Back in August, Google (my employer) announced that all app install campaigns in AdWords are becoming UACs.

Whether you’re starting UACs for the first time or are looking to get the most out of existing UACs, here are some best practices that I’ve discovered from talking with a bunch of other Googlers.

Getting up and running with UAC

The first key step is defining your goal. You’ll need to set a target based on one of these key performance indicators:

If you care about different metrics in different situations, create separate campaigns for each desired outcome.

From there, you’ll need to set up a few more items:

A daily budget. When you’re driving installs, this should be your target CPI multiplied by the number of daily installs you want (shoot for at least 50 to get enough data). When you’re driving in-app actions, it should be your target CPA multiplied by desired daily actions, shooting for at least 10.Your desired user action, which includes stuff like the first install or first open. This could also be your desired in-app action, like making a purchase or completing a game level.Creative assets, which is where you have some real flexibility. If you’re on a smaller budget, AdWords creates those ad assets on your behalf. Bigger advertisers can add a bunch of images and advanced creative assets (we’ll talk about those a bit later).And one final, crucial component: measurement. Do what you need to do to ensure that you’re measuring all of those actions.

How AdWords knows where to serve ads

So, how does AdWords know where to reach those potential new users without keywords, data feeds or any other targeting? Starting with the info about your app itself (its App Store or Play Store description), it examines signals like search queries on Google.com and Google Play, web crawl data and more. This data is mapped across all of the channels where we place ads and updated multiple times per day. That’s how AdWords can quickly pick up on new trending keywords like a sports event or an upcoming holiday and make sure it serves your app in the relevant context, across different properties.

Looking at users who’ve completed your selected action along with those who haven’t, AdWords evaluates a user’s auction signals. This is stuff like device type, the network they’re currently on, which apps they already have, and plenty of other insightful info. From there, patterns from converting users are identified. These patterns are then used to predict future auctions, where and how to bid, and what creatives to serve to other users who fit similar characteristics.

So it’s like DSA + Smart Bidding + similar audiences + a bunch of other stuff, all at the same time, across networks. Plus, it gets better the more it does it.

How you should manage UACs

Although UACs are more automated than other AdWords campaign types, you still have important levers at your disposal.

Update your bids

The target CPI/CPA/ROAS bids you set and modify have a strong influence on how your campaign performs. I definitely recommend staying on top of those targets. As you make any changes, it’s a good idea to adjust targets or budgets up or down 20 percent at most to avoid any drastic changes in performance. Once you’ve made a change, try to wait for at least 100 conversions before making another update. It takes time for automation to respond to new inputs, so be patient. If you’re curious about what impact a bid change might have for you, check out the bid simulator tool.

Provide great ad components

AdWords optimizes what content will show in your ads across channels. It’s best at doing that when it has a bunch of stuff to choose from in your Universal App campaigns.

When it comes to ad text, include a clear call to action. Write standalone sentences. AdWords automatically combines them to create the best text ad. And keep these short, sweet and focused on one unique selling point.

And when it comes to videos and images, don’t be shy. Add what you’ve got. You can (and should) upload 20 images and 20 videos to your campaigns. Plan to add multiple landscape images so AdWords can mix and match different backdrops across different types of users.

I mean what I said about videos, too. Adding videos gives you a lot more opportunity for your app to get noticed. Focus on different video assets in different ratios, like landscape, portrait and square, so AdWords can maximize reach across all properties, including rewarded, YouTube and native ads. After your creatives have time to run, check out the Creative Asset Report in your account to see how each of your creatives is performing.

Steer your automated campaign

Along with bidding and creative options, there are some considerations that might pop up as you get used to managing these campaigns.

Don’t worry about account structure

While countless articles on SEL have been written about how you should structure ad groups and keywords within your campaigns (including by yours truly), don’t worry about that for UAC. Query-level data is leveraged across campaigns and ad groups for search, and impression-level data is leveraged across GDN (Google Display Network) and YouTube.

Protect your brand

I love that Universal App campaigns are about driving conversions. And brand sensitivity is an important consideration as well, which I also love. By default, there are four brand safety filters enabled: not yet labeled (video and content), mature audience (video and content), tragedy and conflict (video) and sensitive social issues (video and content).

On top of those defaults, you can exclude mobile app categories, topics and autodirector videos. And, of course, you can use negative keywords. Negative keywords in UAC apply to all properties, from Google search to YouTube and everything in between. They’re a great way to protect your brand, but they could also blot out some of your traffic. Use negatives with care.

Don’t worry about cannibalization

While your standard search, GDN or YouTube campaigns and UAC will at times be eligible for the same auctions, only one campaign per account (or linked accounts) enters the auction. You aren’t going to bid yourself up with overlap (a common myth in search that I’ve been trying to quash for years).

AdWords chooses which ad to enter into a particular auction based on your active bids and past campaign performance. What’s in your best interest, auction-wise, should be chosen to show. One consideration: If you’re finding that your campaign isn’t getting the traffic you want it to, you might need to raise your bids to make it more competitive in those auctions.

Conclusion

It’s important to understand how to set up Universal App campaigns for success. It’s also important to know what you should be doing to ensure that these campaigns reach their full potential.

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.

SearchCap: Yahoo sues Mozilla, Google Lens review & celebs help Google

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

From Search Engine Land:

The lowdown on driving app downloads with Universal App campaigns
Dec 7, 2017 by Matt Lawson

Google’s Universal App campaigns use machine learning to automate app promotion. Columnist and Googler Matt Lawson goes under the hood to help you understand and master these campaigns.

Is holiday paid search more competitive in 2017 than 2016?
Dec 7, 2017 by Andy Taylor

Columnist Andy Taylor explores year-over-year Auction Insights data from AdWords, revealing insights into this year’s holiday paid search landscape.

Have a question about Will Ferrell? Google may show you a video response directly from him
Dec 7, 2017 by Amy Gesenhues

Google is serving up selfie videos from celebrities answering frequent questions about themselves.

Which PPC metrics matter? Lessons from half a million keywords
Dec 7, 2017 by Jacob Baadsgaard

Columnist Jacob Baadsgaard shares insights from a study looking into how various paid search metrics correlate with return on investment (ROI).

Google Lens an impressive start for ‘visual search’
Dec 6, 2017 by Greg Sterling

While it makes lots of mistakes, it also gets lots of things right.

Yahoo parent sues Mozilla for replacing it with Google as Firefox default search
Dec 6, 2017 by Greg Sterling

Mozilla countersues and says that poor Yahoo search quality caused Firefox to lose market share.

Search News From Around The Web:

Gain a deeper understanding of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder on Google, Google BlogAll the data you need to cover 500 local elections, Google BlogA crabtivating journey: Street View joins a crab migration of millions on Christmas Island, Google BlogGoogle Responds To Blog Bribes Saying It Can Lead To Search Penalties, Search Engine RoundtableHow Long Does SEO Take (The REAL Answer) Watch Now, YouTubeHow to perform an SEO audit. Part 3: Site speed & Engagement, YoastHow Your Website’s Theme Affects SEO & Rankings, cognitiveseo.comKeep the lights on for the last-minute shopper this December, Inside AdWordsParanoid about Google and Amazon spying on you? You’re just paying attention, PhillyWhat Google’s Featured Snippet Search Update Means For Marketers, GEO Marketing

Google Lens an impressive start for 'visual search'

Google Lens has gone live or is about to on Pixel phones in the US, the UK, Australia, Canada, India and Singapore (in English). Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve been using it extensively and have had mostly positive results — though not always.

Currently, Lens can read text (e.g., business cards), identify buildings and landmarks (sometimes), provide information on artwork, books and movies (from a poster) and scan barcodes. It can also identify products (much of the time) and capture and keep (in Google Keep) handwritten notes, though it doesn’t turn them into text.

To use Lens, you tap the icon in the lower right of the screen when Google Assistant is invoked. Then you tap the image or object or part of an object you want to scan.

As a barcode scanner, it works nearly every time. In that regard, it’s worthy and a more versatile substitute for Amazon’s app and just as fast or faster in many cases. If there’s no available barcode, it can often correctly identify products from their packaging or labels. It also does very well identifying famous works of art and books.

Google Lens struggled most with buildings and with products that didn’t have any labeling on them. For example (below), it was rather embarrassingly unable to identify an Apple laptop as a computer, and it misidentified Google Home as “aluminum foil.”

When Lens gets it wrong it asks you to let it know. And when it’s uncertain but you affirm its guess, you can get good information.

I tried Lens on numerous well-known buildings in New York, and it was rarely able to identify them. For example, the three buildings below (left to right) are New York City Hall, the World Trade Center and the Oculus transportation hub. (In the first case, if you’re thinking, he tapped the tree and not the building, I took multiple pictures from different angles, and it didn’t get one right.)

I also took lots of pictures of random objects (articles of clothing, shoes, money) and those searches were a bit hit-and-miss, though often, when it missed it was a near-miss.

As these results indicate, Google Lens is far from perfect. But it’s much much better than Google Goggles ever was, and it will improve over time. Google will also add capabilities that expand use cases.

It’s best right now for very specific uses, which Google tries to point out in its blog post. One of the absolute best uses is capturing business cards and turning them into contacts on your phone.

Assuming that Google is committed to Lens and continues investing in it, over time it could become a widely adopted alternative to traditional mobile and voice search. It might eventually also drive considerable mobile commerce.

AMP: A case for websites serving developing countries

Like Taylor Swift, Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) have a reputation. In a not-very-official Twitter poll, 53 percent claimed AMP was “breaking the web.”

What do you think about AMP?

— Maximiliano Firtman (@firt) March 23, 2017

The mobile ecosystem is already complex: choosing a mobile configuration, accounting for mobile-friendliness, preparing for the mobile-first index, implementing app indexation, utilizing Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) and so on. Tossing AMP into the mix, which creates an entirely duplicated experience, is not something your developers will be happy about.

And yet despite the various issues surrounding AMP, this technology has potential use cases that every international brand should pause to consider.

To start, AMP offers potential to efficiently serve content as fast as possible. According to Google, AMP reduces the median load time of webpages to .7 seconds, compared with 22 seconds for non-AMP sites.

And you can also have an AMP without a traditional HTML page. Google Webmaster Trends Analyst John Mueller has mentioned that AMP pages can be considered as a primary, canonical webpage. This has major implications for sites serving content to developing counties.

Yes, AMP is a restrictive framework that rigorously enforces its own best practices and forces one into its world of amphtml. However, within the AMP framework is a lot of freedom (and its capabilities have grown significantly over the last year). It has built-in efficiencies and smart content prioritization, and a site leveraging AMP has access to Google’s worldwide CDN: Google AMP Cache.

Source: “AMP: Above & Beyond” by Adam Greenberg

All of this is to say that if your brand serves the global market, and especially developing economies, AMP is worth the thought exercise of assessing its implications on your business and user experience.

What in the world-wide web would inspire one to consider AMP?

1. The internet is not the same worldwide

Akamai publishes an amazing quarterly report on the State of the Internet, and the numbers are startling — most of the world operates on 10 Mbps or less, with developing countries operating at less than 5 Mbps, on average.

If 10 Mbps doesn’t make your skin crawl, Facebook’s visual of 4G, 3G and 2G networks worldwide from 2016 (below) will.

Source: Facebook

The visuals show a clear picture: Developing countries don’t have the same internet and wireless network infrastructure as developed economies. This means that brands serving developing countries can’t approach them with the same formula.

2. Websites overall are getting chunkier

While all of this is happening, the average size of website is increasing… and rapidly. According to reports by HTTParchive.org, the average total size of a webpage in 2017 is 387 percent larger than in 2010.

Despite the number of requests remaining consistent over time, the size of files continues to trend upward at an alarming rate. Creating larger sites may be okay in developed economies with strong networking infrastructures; however, users within developing economies could see a substantial lag in performance (which is especially important considering the price of mobile data).

3. Mobile is especially important for developing economies

The increase in website size and data usage comes at a time when mobile is vital within developing economies, as mobile is a lifeline connection for many countries. This assertion is reaffirmed by data from Google’s Consumer Barometer. For illustration, I’ve pulled device data to compare the US versus the developing economies of India and Kenya. The example clearly shows India and Kenya connect significantly more with mobile devices than desktop or tablet.

Source: Consumer Barometer with Google

4. Like winter, more users are coming

At the same time, the internet doesn’t show any signs of slowing down, especially not in developing countries. A recent eMarketer study on Internet Users Worldwide (August 2017) shows a high level of growth in developing countries, such as India, at 15.2 percent. Even the US saw a +2.2 percent bump in user growth!

User penetration as a percent of a country’s total population shows there is still room for growth as well — especially in developing countries.

5. The divide in speed is growing

In the chart below, I choose nine developing countries (per the United Nations’ World Economic Situation and Prospects report) to compare with the United States’ internet speed (which ranked 10th worldwide in the last report). Despite the overarching trend of growth, there is a clear divide emerging in late 2012 — and it appears to be growing.

[Click to enlarge]

Why is this significant? As internet connection speeds increase, so do page sizes. But as page sizes increase to match the fast speeds expected in developed nations, it means that users in developing nations are having a worse and worse experience with these websites.

So, what should one do about it?

The data above paint a picture: Worldwide internet penetration worldwide continues to grow rapidly, especially in developing nations where mobile devices are the primary way to access the internet. At the same time, webpages are getting larger and larger — potentially leading to a poor user experience for internet users in developing nations, where average connection speeds have fallen far behind those in the US and other developed nations.

How can we address this reality to serve the needs of users in developing economies?

Test your mobile experience.

AMP isn’t necessary if your site leverages mobile web optimization techniques, runs lean and is the picture of efficiency; however, this is challenging (especially given today’s web obesity crisis). Luckily, there are many tools that offer free speed analyses for webpages, including:

Test My Site tool (via Think With Google)Page Speed Insights tool (via Google Developers)Mobile-Friendly Test (via Google Search Console)WebPageTest.org

Develop empathy through experience.

Allow yourself to step into your customers’ shoes and experience your site. As former CEO of Moz, Rand Fishkin, once aptly stated, “Customer empathy > pretty much everything else.”

Regular empathy is hard. Empathy for people you don’t know is nearly impossible. If we don’t see the problem, feel it and internalize the challenge, we can’t hope alleviate it.

Facebook introduced a 2G Tuesdays, where employees logging into the company’s app on Tuesday mornings are offered the option to switch to a simulated 2G connection for an hour to support empathy for users in the developing world. If you’re looking to try something similar, any Chrome/Canary user can simulate any connection experience through Chrome Developer Tools through the Network Panel.

Consider if AMP is right for your site.*

You should entertain the thought of leveraging AMP as a primary experience if your brand meets the following criteria:

Your site struggles with page-speed issues.You’re doing business in a developing economy.You’re doing business with a country with network infrastructure issues.The countries you target leverage browsers and search engines that support AMP.Serving your content to users as efficiently as possible is important to your brand, service and mission.

*Note: AMP’s architecture can also be used to improve your current site and inform your page speed optimization strategy, including:

Paying attention to and limiting heavy third-party JavaScript, complex CSS, and non-system fonts (where impactful to web performance, and not interfering with the UX).Making scripts asynchronous (where possible).For HTTP/1.1 limiting calls preventing round-trip loss via pruning or inlining (this does not apply to HTTP/2 due to multiplexing).Leveraging resource hints (a.k.a. the Pre-* Party), where applicable.Optimizing images (including: using the optimal format, appropriate compression, making sure images are as close to their display size as possible, image SRCSET attribute, lazy loading (when necessary), etc.)Using caching mechanisms appropriately.Leveraging a CDN.Paying attention to and actively evaluating the page’s critical rendering path.

Educate your team about AMP, and develop a strategy that works for your brand.

AMP has a plethora of great resources on the main AMP Project site and AMP by Example.

If you decide to go with AMP as a primary experience in certain countries, don’t forget to leverage the appropriate canonical/amphtml and hreflang tags. And make sure to validate your code!

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.

Omnichannel shoppers collide with Black Friday and Cyber Monday, setting new records

Black Friday and Cyber Monday continue to gain cultural significance across the US and the globe as shoppers and retailers deepen their relationships through enhanced technology, stronger/more personalized deals and a singular online-offline approach. As for 2017, all major metrics trended up, including click volume, mobile purchases, foot traffic and overall sales. Cyber Monday 2017 marked the biggest shopping day in US history, with over $6.59B in sales, including a record-breaking $2B in mobile sales.

Bing (my employer) also saw strong positive trends, with a YOY jump in clicks across Black Friday, Cyber Monday and the entire month of November. In the US, clicks were up 9 percent (cross-device) between Black Friday and Cyber Monday when compared with the same time period in 2016, and we also saw clicks up 12 percent YOY for the month of November. The rise in clicks is likely due to large retailers who extend Black Friday deals earlier and later — a trend US consumers have come to expect as retailers like Walmart and Toyota offered week-long Black Friday deals.

This increase in clicks YOY wasn’t just a trend we saw in the US, but also around the world, as Black Friday and Cyber Monday become a global phenomenon. Bing’s international clicks across all devices were up over 17 percent for Black Friday and 20 percent for Cyber Monday.

The holiday numbers also support a strong omnichannel approach throughout the 2017 season. According to Matt Shay, CEO of the National Retail Federation (NRF), 51 million Americans shopped exclusively in stores throughout the holiday weekend, 58 million Americans shopped exclusively online, and a majority 65 million shopped both, representing the new sweet spot for leading retailers.

The online, mobile and in-store experience needs to work in harmony if retailers are going to continue in the new economy. The NRF reported that over 174 million Americans showed up in stores over the holiday weekend as retailers wooed consumers with free coffee bars, foot massages and cosmetic samples. As the numbers show, these same shoppers went home to buy online, many of them making purchases on their phones. The Home Depot even reported seeing more mobile traffic than desktop.

Black Friday deals also popped up in some new places, such as the Amazon Alexa, where users could find early deals starting November 22 through voice shopping. In classic omnichannel form, Amazon leveraged their Whole Foods brick-and-mortars to promote their Alexa devices. Every retailer should be following suit, combining their online and offline forces for maximum impact.

Bing’s Black Friday to Cyber Monday search trends

I love digging into the query reports post-Black Friday and Cyber Monday to highlight a few trends and see what has changed in consumer behavior as users search for deals this holiday season. Here are the insights I uncovered based on search trend data from the 2017 Black Friday to Cyber Monday shopping period:

Don’t forget to add year-modified keywords

We continued to see the trend where consumers are adding the calendar year to their search queries when looking for specific deals and offers. The top Black Friday and Cyber Monday intent-related keywords can be summarized in the following query combinations:

‘Tis the season for tech and entertainment

As in previous years, we saw a surge in tech-related queries as consumers searched for the latest phones and gaming consoles. It’s no surprise to me that the most-searched-for tech items are the two that are almost impossible to find with a discount: the iPhone X and Xbox One X.

We’re also seeing search trends that point to this year’s hottest toys. Last year, Hatchimals were the toy du jour; this year, Fingerlings have taken over. There was also a surge in searches for Yu-Gi-Oh! Dueling Nexus.

It’s also the time of the year to be entertained, so it wasn’t a surprise to see the movie “Bad Moms Christmas” as one of the top new queries over the holiday weekend.

It’s not too late

There’s still time to make the most of the 2017 holiday season. Here are five quick ways you should be using search to leverage your omnichannel strategy:

    Get ready for Green Monday. The 2016 comScore data rated the second Monday in December, or Green Monday, as one of the busiest shopping days of the year. Be sure your campaign budgets are high enough to accommodate a likely spike in traffic on Monday, December 11.Watch your budgets: Make sure you account for high-traffic shopping days. 2016 comScore data showed a string of 27 consecutive billion-dollar shopping days between Thanksgiving and Christmas, up from nine consecutive billion-dollar days in 2015. If this trend continues, it is worth keeping an eye on campaign budgets between Thanksgiving and Christmas, paying special attention to your top traffic days for the 2016 holiday season to make sure you don’t run out of budget before the end of the month.Know your shipping cutoff dates. Make it easy for your customers to understand the deadlines for ground shipping, two-day shipping, next-day shipping, or even same-day shipping, so their gifts can make it on time. I pulled together the dates from USPS, UPS and FedEx for you in the graphic below:
    Use ad extensions to call out shipping cutoffs and promotions. No one likes buying holiday presents only to miss the cutoff by a single day. Be sure to clearly communicate your shipping requirements with customers, including placing it in ad copy and site extensions. It’s not too late to use countdown ads customizers in your ad copy to call out shipping cutoffs or to call attention to those last-minute holiday promotions.If available, advertise free store pickup. Most of today’s leading retailers are offering free store pickup as a solution for busy holiday shoppers. If applicable, advertise free store pickup in ad copy and site extensions, especially after shipping cutoff dates pass.

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.

The importance of targeting branded searches

Search experts understand the importance of targeting non-branded search terms: Optimizing for high-volume, non-branded terms can drive a significant amount of traffic to your brand’s site.

While targeting non-branded search terms plays an essential role in your overall search strategy, many brands still underestimate and neglect the power of branded search terms. By relying on the strength of a brand and integrating branded search tactics with current non-branded search strategies, your business can discover more qualified leads — and, as a result, increase conversions.

The role of branded search in consumer behavior

For many established companies, their branded terms make up a majority of their keyword profile. If people are searching for your brand or products by name, they’re likely deeper within the sales funnel. In fact, Google has found that branded keywords have over two times higher conversion rates when compared to non-branded terms. So why would brands shy away from increasing or stepping up their branded search efforts?

Let’s flip the script and put you in the customer’s shoes. Say you’re searching for a fitness tracker your brother would love this holiday season. When you begin your gift hunt, are you more likely to search for “best fitness tracker for men,” or for “best Fitbit for men”?

Data from Google AdWords Keyword Planner

Due to the Fitbit’s brand awareness efforts, the product is iconic enough that consumers search for it more often than non-branded terms. Search engines like Google, Bing and Amazon recognize the strength of the brand — SERP layouts and competitive pricing reflect this.

Brands working to improve their conversions need to work the entire marketing funnel. For brands or products well-known enough for branded search terms to be relevant to audiences, it’s important to know how audiences discover your products so you can target these branded search terms. Otherwise, you’re leaving money on the table for competitors and review sites to take for themselves.

Integrating branded search tactics into marketing strategy

With a strong brand, and thus stronger branded search terms, bread-and-butter search tactics will have some incredible advantages. These advantages span both paid search and organic search tactics, affecting every aspect of search from the page rankings, search boxes, knowledge panel, and even map results. With branded search, search engines will recognize your main site, if optimized for best practices, as the most relevant site for searching by potential customers.

Organic search

Your home page and (if applicable) product category pages should rank the best for high-traffic branded search terms. Your title tags and meta descriptions should clearly display these branded search terms and relevant context that encourages searchers to make the decision to click. Once they do, the site should match the promise the SERP listing made with this copy.

Your goal should always be to dominate the first page and to obtain the highest positions with optimal branded search efforts. Brands should not only focus on their branded terms at the user’s research and consideration phases of the funnel, but also the post-purchase phase.

In the research phase, searchers will find strong, relevant brands first and foremost. Consider that they will also be looking for reviews, pricing and where to buy the product. This information should be available to users prior to their converting.

But the job isn’t done after converting. Post-purchase, many users will search for more information about the product using branded terms — installation instructions, how-to guides, proper cleaning and maintenance techniques, general product help and more — and these searches should lead to your website.

All of the brand-related terms throughout the sales funnel have heightened search term relevance to affect consideration, conversion and continued use.

Paid search

If you plan to own as much real estate on the SERPs as possible, paid search is an essential tactic to earn qualified leads. Even if you have obtained the top ranking in organic search results, research suggests that having an ad can produce incremental clicks. With little competition, it’s pretty easy (and cheap) to own these paid search spaces.

With branded search ads, you should be making use of ad extensions. These will provide more information to searchers, which can make your ad stand out and entice users to click. Certain extensions — such as sitelink, location or price extensions — can also increase your listing’s SERP real estate, particularly on mobile.

Keep in mind that Google factors ad extensions into its Ad Rank calculation, so proper use of extensions can give you an edge over competitors who may be running conquest campaigns on your brand name.

Other branded search considerations

Beyond the basics of SERPs with organic and paid search listings, you should be taking advantage of additional branded search real estate options that should be taken advantage of, including:

Organic sitelinks, the links that are displayed under the top organic search result. They’re important since they occupy a lot of SERP real estate and can function as an outline of your site, helping users to navigate to your other top pages. Google determines whether it will provide sitelinks or not, so you don’t have direct control over this — but you can help Google out by submitting an XML sitemap and having your site set up with a logical hierarchy.

Apple shows six organic sitelinks for a branded search. Note the site search box, too.

You want to make sure map results are showing up for you if your brand or business has physical locations. To do this, you need to ensure that you’ve set up Google My Business listings with the correct NAP (name, address and phone) information.If your site has an internal search function, you then have a solid chance of a search box showing up on Google. If it doesn’t display within the SERPs, you can utilize structured data markup per Google’s guidelines.The Knowledge Graph helps users discover business information quickly and easily. Google will pull this information automatically from trustworthy sites like Wikipedia or WebMD. With the right mix of search tactics, you can obtain a Knowledge Graph result for your brand. Make sure that you have all social channels, a solid description, reviews and accurate information correctly displaying in the eye-catching Knowledge Graph.

Final thoughts

Branded searches are imperative and shouldn’t be overlooked. Many assume that search queries involving your brand will naturally lead to your website, but that’s simply not the case. Without optimizing your paid and organic search efforts to capture branded searches throughout the entire purchase cycle, you’ll be missing out on tons of potential new traffic and conversions. Owning as much real estate as possible for your brand is crucial, especially during high-traffic seasonality.

Oftentimes, branded search terms can be the last channel touch point for consumers who are about ready to convert on one of your products or services. By incorporating branded search into your overall digital marketing strategy, you can quickly accelerate your brand, helping it stand out on the SERPs and provide a better experience to audiences.

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.

Video Advertising: Tips for success in 2018

Consumer demand for digital video is exploding. According to a recent study by Cisco, video will make up a whopping 80 percent of all internet traffic by 2019. But that’s mostly people watching videos of cats falling off furniture, right?

Not entirely. In fact, 64 percent of users* are more likely to buy a product online after watching a video, and 59 percent of company decision-makers** would rather watch a video than read an article or blog post.

Are you ready to ride the video wave for digital marketing success?

Attend this December 14 webinar to examine the opportunities and emerging best practices around video advertising. You’ll learn:

how video ads are impacting paid search.comparative data on video vs. text vs. display.formatting and creative tips to improve ROI.innovations in video that are driving results.

Register today for “Press Play on Video Advertising: Tips for success in 2018,” produced by Digital Marketing Depot and sponsored by Marin Software.

*Source: comScore

**Source: HubSpot

Oracle DMP adds integration with Bing Ads custom audiences

Advertisers using Oracle DMP can now integrate their first-party data into Bing Ads to create custom audiences for targeting on the search engine, the companies announced Wednesday.

The integration opens up additional targeting, bidding and messaging strategies that can be specific to what an advertiser knows about the audience being targeted. For example, messaging to users who have performed certain actions, or who are in certain income groupings, can be different from a run-of-the-mill ad that might go to a general remarketing audience.

As these audiences may also represent more value, advertisers can also bid more aggressively on searches performed by users in these audience lists.

Launched in pilot in June 2017, Bing Ads Custom Audiences function as a remarketing bucket, where advertisers can use their own data to create audience segments for ad targeting. Initially, the pilot was limited to first-party data from Adobe Audience Manager, with Bing Ads stating there would be further integrations forthcoming.

“Onboarding first-party data into the Oracle DMP with Oracle OnRamp offers marketers the ability to integrate the data they want to use into their Bing Ads campaigns,” said Joe Zito, vice president/GM of Oracle DMP Strategy, in a statement. “Marketers can seamlessly orchestrate retargeting campaigns and improve Bing Ad targeting accuracy with audience data provided through the Oracle DMP.”

Advertisers can contact their Bing Ads or Oracle DMP account reps for additional help in getting started with the Bing Ads Custom Audiences pilot.

Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.

Twitter broadens its AMP support to include analytics

Twitter is broadening its support of AMP (accelerated mobile pages) to include article analytics.

According to the announcement on Twitter’s developer blog, when Twitter loads an AMP version of an article, it will now ping the original article URL to record the view, in addition to passing the query arguments from the original article redirect into the AMP run-time. This will allow publishers to receive the data using the amp-analytics component.

“Pings to your original article are annotated as coming from Twitter,” writes Twitter product manager Ben Ward, “So that you can better understand the origin of the traffic, and distinguish it from organic views of your pages.”

While Twitter has supported AMP since its launch by making it possible to embed tweets within AMP articles, it has not offered analytics attached to AMP content shared on the platform until now. With this latest update, publishers will have deeper insight into how their AMP content is performing on Twitter.

“With this update, Twitter uses AMP to present your articles to more people, faster and more reliably,” writes Ward.

SearchCap: Twitter AMP analytics, Bing Ads & targeting branded searches

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

From Search Engine Land:

Twitter broadens its AMP support to include analytics
Dec 6, 2017 by Amy Gesenhues
Twitter says the new AMP analytics feature will help distinguish page views happening on Twitter versus organic page views.

Oracle DMP adds integration with Bing Ads custom audiences
Dec 6, 2017 by Susan Wenograd
This marks the second integration for the audience targeting pilot.

Video Advertising: Tips for success in 2018
Dec 6, 2017 by Digital Marketing Depot
Consumer demand for digital video is exploding. According to a recent study by Cisco, video will make up a whopping 80 percent of all internet traffic by 2019. But that’s mostly people watching videos of cats falling off furniture, right? Not entirely.

The importance of targeting branded searches
Dec 6, 2017 by Thomas Stern
Though many search marketers focus primarily on non-branded searches, columnist Thomas Stern believes it’s crucial to invest in a branded search strategy.

Omnichannel shoppers collide with Black Friday and Cyber Monday, setting new records
Dec 6, 2017 by Christi Olson
Columnist Christi Olson shares consumer and search data from the recent holiday weekend — and provides tips for how to use search to boost your omnichannel holiday marketing strategy.

AMP: A case for websites serving developing countries
Dec 6, 2017 by Alexis Sanders
As the gap in connection speeds between developed and developing nations continues to widen, columnist Alexis Sanders argues that brands can use Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) to address this gap.

Search News From Around The Web:

How brands secretly buy their way into Forbes, Fast Company, and HuffPost stories, The OutlineGoogle My Business Looks to the Future, Street FightGoogle Testing Mobile Search Interface With Few Organic Results & No Next Page Button, Search Engine RoundtableHow to perform an SEO audit. Part 2: General SEO, YoastTo Disavow or Not to Disavow, that is the question, Majestic Blog